Warriewood Valley post 1991 Land Release

The Warriewood Valley and Ingleside residential land release was announced by the State Government originally in 1991, and Pittwater Council were given the task of planning development in the release area. A consultative committee was formed with significant community consultation, and it was finally decided in 1997 by the State Government that Ingleside would be delayed, and that plans should proceed for the Warriewood Valley sectors only. The 1997 Warriewood Valley Draft Planning Framework and DCP 29 became the established guidelines for the development of the 110 Ha that made up the Warriewood Valley release area, with a planned yield of 1510 dwellings. Sectors were to be planned in detail on a sector by sector basis, and while nominated dwelling yield for each sector was not to be exceeded, developers had the freedom to determine the detail associated with each masterplan, and how a mix of dwelling densities would be spread around a given sector, and at the same time providing for the road network, open space, and water management.

Dwelling yields in the ‘Warriewood Valley Urban Land Release Planning Framework 1997′

  • Sectors 1, 2, 9, 10 and 12 were allocated a land use of mixed residential; 15 dwellings/Ha. For sectors 1 & 2 along Warriewood Rd this was in character with the other side which was developed as traditional residential in the 1960’s, and 15 dwellings/Ha was considered appropriate for sectors 9 & 10 at the back of the valley, and sector 12 which also included some flood prone areas.
  • Sectors 3, 5, 8 and 11 were allocated a land use of medium density residential; 25 dwellings/ha. This matched the pre-existing townhouse complexes on Macpherson St.
  • A sector masterplan had to be produced by each sector for approval by Council before rezoning and development of each sector. This was essential for the overall infrastructure and water management in the valley.
  • The Buffer Areas were not allocated a yield at this time. This was because this land was in the 400m Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) Buffer Area which prevented any further residential development under EPA guidelines, until the STP was capped to prevent odours escaping from the STP. However 330 residential dwellings already existed within the STP Buffer area as did Warriewood Centro, McDonalds and the cinema. Another issue was the undeveloped land zoned light-industrial along Warriewood Rd which the community wanted rezoned to residential. A very frustrating situation for the residents, landowners and Pittwater Council.

1997 map 750

As a result of much debate between Sydney Water, Pittwater Council, the Dept of Planning and our local member and a court case between landowners and Pittwater Council, Sydney Water developed a proposal to  ‘cap’ the plant which would allow residential development within the STP buffer area to proceed, and as a result, the STP Buffer Sector Draft Planning Framework 2001 was produced by Pittwater Council? It was based however on the understanding that landowners/developers would pay the cost of capping the STP

 Dwelling yields in the ‘STP Buffer Sector Draft Planning Framework 2001’

  • This added another 412 dwellings bringing the density yield total to 1922 dwellings.
  • Subsector 101 was allocated a land use of mixed residential; 15 dwellings/Ha with a limit total of 136 dwellings. This carried on the character of Warriewood Rd.
  • Subsectors 102 and 103 were allocated a land use of medium density residential; 25 dwellings/Ha with a limit total of 125 dwellings for Subsector 102 and 151 dwellings for Subsector 103. This carried on the medium density along Macpherson St.

2001 map 750

The issue of who would pay for the odour mitigation work at the STP; Sydney Water, the developers or both and how this would affect the density and price of the land. This issue was not resolved until 2006. The ARV (Anglican Retirement Village) which owned part of Buffer sector 102 helped force the issue as it gained a deferred consent from the State Government under SEPP SL (State Environment Planning Policy Senior Living development). Pittwater Council required an agreement between Sydney Water and ARV prior to construction and ARV agreed to contribute an undisclosed amount to the odour mitigation works. Meriton, who owned Buffer Sector 103, was involved with ongoing court cases over the buffer issue. According to the Manly Daily, Meriton agreed to pay $3million of the total $14milllion cost to cap the plant and Sydney Water paid the remainder, which was later to be recovered from other developers in the buffer areas as development occurred.

It is very difficult to find out exactly who paid what to cap the plant and what ongoing costs and future costs still have to be paid, but suffice is to say that it was certainly a significant issue for land owners and developers wanting to develop that area.. The estimated cost started at $7.5 million in 2001 and was up to $27 million by 2004.

In 2006 the ARV development was approved and when completed will have 260 self-contained dwellings and a 119 bed nursing home. It is being built in 2 sectors; most of Buffer Subsector 102 and a small portion of Sector 3. This land had yields of 105 dwellings and 34 dwellings for a total of 139 dwellings. The ARV development therefore represents an additional 121 dwellings plus a 119 bed nursing home above that anticipated in Pittwater Council’s 1997 and 2001 Planning Frameworks.

In 2010, as a result of Pittwater Council reviewing the progress of the Warriewood Valley development and identifying the land not yet developed, some of the undeveloped sectors had their land use changed or density yields increased.

 Density yields in the ‘Warriewood Valley Planning Framework 2010’

  • This Planning Framework increases the density yield to 2012 dwellings but the ARV’s additional 121 dwellings plus a 119 bed nursing home were not accounted for in these figures.
  • The sector numbers changed as some parts of previous Sectors 1, 8, 10 and buffer subsector 103 were not developed and so became sectors 101, 801, 10A.1, 10A.2, 10B & buffer 2A. Previous Sector 3 was divided into 3 sectors; 301, 302 & 303. Previous Buffer Subsector 102 was divided into 2 sectors, buffer 2a and 2b. Previous Buffer Subsector 101 was divided into 13 sectors; buffer 1a up to buffer 1m.
  • Sectors 301, 302, 303 501, 801, 101, 10A.1, 10A.2, 10B and Buffer 1m had no dwelling density change from those stated in 1997 and 2001.
  • Sector 901 had a dwelling density change from 15/ha and a limit total of 205 dwellings in 1997 to 25/ha (with 15m street frontage @ 10/ha) and a limit total of 245 dwelling.
  • Buffer 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 1f, 1g, 1h, 1i, 1j, 1k and 1l had a dwelling density change for 15/ha and a limit total of 136 dwellings in 2001 to 25/ha (with 15m street frontage @ 10/ha) and a limit total of  201 dwellings.
  • The 15m street frontage @ 10/ha in Sector 901 and Buffer Sectors 1a up to 1l was important as it allowed the street frontage to stay in character with the area.
  • Buffer 2a required a site specific design and a max of 20 dwellings.
  • Buffer 3a and 3b are interesting as the land use remains the same as it was in 2001 at 25/ha but the limit total of dwellings increased from 151 to 193; 186 in Buffer 3a and 7 in Buffer 3b.

 2010 Map 750

In 2010 as a parting ‘present’ the PAC and State Labour Planning Minister, Tony Kelly, approved the Part 3a development at 14-18 Boondah Rd and Warriewood Valley had the Meriton development forced upon it. This land in Buffer Sector 3a had a density yield of 186 dwellings but instead we got 3 and 4 storey unit buildings with a total of 449 dwellings. This is an additional 269 dwellings!

 The recent “Strategic Review”, was initiated by the NSW Planning Assessment Commission (PAC) and Dept of Planning and Infrastructure (DoP&I) as a result of the PAC’s approval of the Meriton Development on the corner of Boondah Rd and Macpherson St. The PAC report called for “a comprehensive strategic study for all undeveloped land in Warriewood Valley”. As a result the draft report recommended that some of the undeveloped sectors have their land use changed or density yields increased yet again, and in some cases quite significantly, and this when the community sent a clear message to those proposing such an increase, that this was just not acceptable!

 Recommended density yields in the ‘Draft Warriewood Valley Strategic Review Report 2012’

  • Sectors 301,302,303 501 801 and Buffer 3b have a recommended dwelling density increase from 25/ha to 32/ha.
  • Sector 901 has been broken into 8 sectors, 901A to 901H and of these 901D, 901E, 901G and 901H have not been allocated any density yield as they were in 2010. The remaining sectors 901A, 901B, 901C and 901F have a recommended dwelling density increase from 25/ha (with 15m street frontage @ 10/ha) to 36/ha (subject to amalgamation). This further increases the dwelling yield from 205 dwellings in 1997, 245 dwellings in 2010 and now recommends 263 dwellings in 2012 for an area that is only …% of the original sector 9.
  • Buffer sector 1a has been developed at 19/ha.
  •  Buffer sectors 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 1f, 1g, 1h, 1i, 1j, 1k & 1l have a recommended dwelling density increase from 25/ha (with 15m street frontage @ 10/ha) to 32/ha. This further increases the dwelling yield from 136 dwellings in 2001, 201 dwellings in 2010 and now recommends 265 dwellings in 2012; almost double the original yield.
  • Sectors 10A.1 and 10A.2 have been recommended no yield compared to 15/ha in 2010 while Sector 10B has a recommended density increase for 15/ha in 2010 to 20/ha.
  • Buffer 2a has a recommended density of 22/ha, a yield increase from 20 to 29.
  • Sector 101 has a recommended density increase from 15/ha in 2010 to 26/ha.
  • Page 72 of the review states “There may be opportunities for higher densities in certain locations through site amalgamations”. According to the ‘Warriewood Valley Urban Design Study’ by HBO+EMTB if sectors 301, 302 and 303 amalgamate it could achieve a density of 38/ha. Warriewood Rd could also achieve higher densities of 36/ha, 53/ha and 55/ha if certain sectors amalgamate.
  • Sectors 10A.1, 10A.2, 901D, 901E, 901G, 901H and 120 Mona Vale Rd have not been allocated a density yield but may be at a later date.

2012 map 750

According to the Strategic Review it provides for a total of 2544 dwellings in the Warriewood Valley Release Area. This amount includes an additional 269 dwellings due to increasing density recommended by council and the 263 additional dwellings approved by the PAC. But again, where is the ARV’s additional 121 dwellings plus 119 bed nursing home? What about Sectors 10A.1, 10A.2, 901D, 901E, 901G, 901H and 120 Mona Vale Rd which have not been allocated a yield but may be at a later date? If sectors amalgamate will density yield be allowed to increase even further?  What will the final number really be??

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